1. Chinese
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Sydney Harbour skyline at night

Living in Australia

Back to home

Your first weeks in Australia may be filled with excitement and confusion, but with a little preparation you can make a smooth transition.

ANZ has a wealth of experience in helping customers planning to move to Australia. By helping to arrange your Australian banking in Australia before you leave home and sharing a little local knowledge, we can help you get settled quickly.

ANZ Branches for new arrivals

ANZ has a wealth of experience in helping new arrivals to Australia, and we understand the need for timely and practical advice.

We have over 780 branches across Australia that can assist you with your banking needs. If you are in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide or Perth we recommend visiting one of our specialist ANZ branches that can provide additional support as you set yourself up in Australia:

Branch Contact Name Address Phone Number

Sydney

Sydney Chinatown (Haymarket) 665-669 George Street (02) 9219 2713
Westfield Centre Court Level 2, Shop 2168/6, Cnr Church & Argyle Sts (02) 9891 4390
Campsie 230 Beamish Street (02) 9787 6811
Chatswood 382 Victoria Avenue (02) 9422 0200
Eastwood 168 Rowe Street (02) 9804 6411
Hurstville 6 Cross Street (02) 9579 7344

Melbourne

Bourke St Mall 309-325 Bourke St Mall (03) 9650 7007
Doncaster Shoppingtown (Inside) Shop 41, Westfield Shopping Centre, 619 Doncaster Road (03) 9848 2299
Melbourne Chinatown 230 Swanston Street (03) 9639 3512
The Pines Shop 36 The Pines Shopping Centre, Blackburn & Reynolds Roads (03) 9841 9644
Box Hill 10 Main Street (03) 9843 3500
Glen Waverley 2 Kingsway (03) 9803 5011

Adelaide

King William St Branch 121 King William Street (08) 7129 1300
Adelaide Chinatown 107 Gouger Street (08) 8410 8508
112 Rundle Mall 112 Rundle Mall (08) 8232 4860

Perth

Allendale Sq 77 St Georges Terrace (08) 9323 8111

Brisbane

Sunnybank Time Square 250 McCullough Street, Sunnybank, 4109 (07) 3323 8200
Sunnybank Hills Corner Calam & Compton Rds (07) 3273 5230
Fortitude Valley 204 Wickham Street, Fortitude Valley, 4006 (07) 3852 1494

Locate any other ANZ branch.

Local knowledge

Australia's biggest attraction is its natural beauty. The landscape varies from endless sunbaked horizons to dense tropical rainforest to chilly southern beaches. Scattered along the coasts, its cities blend a European enthusiasm for art and food with a laid-back love of sport and the outdoors. Economically, Australia is thriving, with good business relations with its Asian neighbours and strong diplomatic ties to the US.

  1. Area
  2. 7,682,300 square kilometres

  3. Population
  4. 23 million

  5. Local currency
  6. Australia's currency is the Australian dollar (AUD), made up of 100 cents. There are 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, $1 and $2 coins, and $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 notes. Although the smallest coin in circulation is 5c, prices are often still marked in single cents and then rounded to the nearest 5c when you come to pay.

    Cash amounts equal to or in excess of the equivalent of AUD$10,000 (in any currency) must be declared on arrival or departure.

  7. Languages
  8. Australia's official language is English although because it is such a multi-cultural country, it's not unusual to walk down a city street and hear people speaking Italian, Greek, Lebanese, Vietnamese or Arabic as their first language. Australians also have a passion for abbreviations and are liable to use a local slang that can take the first-time visitor a while to untangle.

  9. Time
  10. Australian spans three time zones:

    1. Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST) GMT/UTC +10 includes Sydney and Melbourne
    2. Australian Central Time (ACT) GMT/UTC +9.5 includes Adelaide
    3. Australian Western Standard Time (AWST) GMT/UTC +8 includes Perth

    During 'Daylight Saving' clocks move an hour to maximise daylight during waking hours. This starts on the last Sunday in October (for Tasmania, it's the first Sunday) and ends the last Sunday in March.

    Find the time in Australian cities relative to other world cities.

  11. Country dialing code
  12. +61

  13. Electricity
  14. 220-240V, 50Hz

  15. Useful websites
  16. www.gov.au is the Australian Government Gateway to all federal, state, territory and local government sites.

    www.nla.gov.au/npapers is an Australian Newspapers Online, National Library-maintained listing of Australian newspaper websites.

    www.australia.com is the Australian Tourist Commission's Official federal government-run tourism site with nationwide info for visitors.

  17. Everyday living in Australia
  18. Opening hours

    The below times provide a common guide of when most businesses are open. Opening hours can vary by state and whether they're in a large or small town


    Business Type Monday - Friday Saturday Sunday Variations
    Standard shops & business 9am - 5pm 9am - 12pm or 5pm Limited to major cities, towns and urban areas. Hours can vary by state. Often towns have late night shopping (open until 9pm) once or twice per week
    Banks 9:30am - 4pm Some larger branches open.   Some larger branches open until 9pm on Thursdays or Fridays. View specific branch hours on the ANZ Branch Locator.
    Post Offices 9am - 5pm Australia Post shops & Local Post Office Agencies only    
    Restaurants Lunch from noon
    Dinner from 6pm
    Lunch from noon
    Dinner from 6pm
    Lunch from noon
    Dinner from 6pm
    Cafés are open most of the day with some closing around 5pm.
    Pubs & Bars Drinks noon - late
    Lunch noon - 2pm
    Dinner 6pm - 8pm
    Drinks noon - late
    Lunch noon - 2pm
    Dinner 6pm - 8pm
    Lunch noon - 2pm
    Dinner 6pm - 8pm
    Pubs and bars are busiest for drinks from Thursday - Saturday.
    Supermarkets 9am - 8pm 9am - 8pm 9am - 8pm Several main supermarkets are open 24 hours.
    Milk bars (general stores) 7am - late 9am - late 9am - 5pm Opening hours vary widely due to milk bars being privately managed.
  19. Accessing money
  20. Australia is well and truly a card-carrying society. Banks are found all over Australia, and provide 24-hour automated teller machines (ATMs). Most ATMs accept cards issued by other banks and are linked to international networks. EFTPOS (Electronic Funds Transfer at Point Of Sale) is a convenient service that Australian businesses have embraced. You can use your bank card (credit or debit) to pay for services or purchases directly, and often withdraw cash as well.

  21. Tipping
  22. Tipping is not expected in Australia, but it is common practice. Around 10-15% is appreciated at restaurants; in taxis it's good practice to round up the fare.

  23. Transport
  24. Australia is so vast that something like 80% of long-distance trips are made by air. Qantas is Australia's main domestic airline and has a budget subsidiary called Jetstar. A competing carrier that flies all over the country is Virgin Blue. In the major cities, driving is probably best avoided in city centres as parking is difficult and roads can get congested at peak times, but it's a good way to get around town otherwise as distances can be great. Each city has its own intricacies: Sydney has lots of one-way streets that makes navigation difficult; while in central Melbourne, many intersections require that you make a 'hook' turn - a right-hand turn from the left lane - so as not to obstruct tram tracks. Local transport, such as trains, light rail, trams and buses can be a good way to get around, especially if you decide to live in the inner suburbs where journeys are shorter.

    In Sydney, ferries (Sydney Ferries information online) provide the most enjoyable way of getting around. Many people use ferries to commute, so there are frequent connecting bus services. Ferries operate between 6am and midnight. Brisbane has a good ferry network, too.

    Cycling is another good way to get around. Australia is equipped with lots of good bike paths; visit Bikepaths online for maps in Victoria and New South Wales. In Brisbane, pick up a copy of the city council's Brisbane Bicycle Experience Guide booklet from visitor information centres.

    Taxis are easily flagged down in the city centre and the inner suburbs. All taxis are metered and taxi drivers won't usually rip you off, but don't always expect them to know where you're going. If they're unsure, get them to turn off the meter while they check the street directory.

  25. Leisure
  26. In all major cities, finding something to do is easy, as Australia is spoilt for choice activity-wise. There's a plethora of sports clubs, offering football, cricket and tennis, as well as gyms, spas and yoga aplenty - if you like to get active you're sure to find something to do. To search for something close to you, visit the sporting club pages on overton.websyte.com.

    Australia has some amazing golf courses. You'll find a summary of golf courses in all states by visiting Ausgolf online, while for gyms, visit the Yellow Pages website. Many gyms offer monthly memberships and casual rates. Those who prefer to watch sport rather than play it, shouldn't miss a game of Australian Rules Football, (AFL; visit the AFL website). Rugby League (visit the NRL website) and Rugby Union (visit the Rugby Union website) are also popular, particularly in Queensland and New South Wales, and soccer is enjoying increasing popularity since the Socceroos made it to the World Cup; for national games check out the A-League (visit the A-League website).

    If you want something more relaxed, there are short courses in wine and coffee appreciation, cooking, languages and much more. Check out short-course guides at the local universities.

  27. Food and drink
  28. Typically, a restaurant meal in Australia is a relaxed affair. You'll probably order within 15 minutes, and see the first course in 20 minutes and the main about half an hour later. Solo diners will find that cafés and noodle bars are welcoming, and good fine dining restaurants often treat you like a star.

    There's not a huge culture of street vending in Australia. In cities the variety of quick eats is great; gourmet sandwich bars and delis, globally inspired takeaways, bakeries, and sushi or salad bars. If you're at a rugby league or Aussie Rules football match, a meat pie is compulsory fare.

    All sorts of takeaway menus will be put into your mail box - everything from Japanese, Vietnamese, Chinese and Indian, to roast chicken, fish and chips, and pizza.

    Supermarkets are everywhere, as are 24-hour convenience stores (mostly in the major cities). Australia's fresh food markets offer wonderful fresh produce, and a visit to the Sydney Fish Market or Melbourne's Queen Victoria market should not be missed.

  29. Etiquette and language tips
  30. Australians are pretty relaxed group of people, and this extends to the way they approach dining. At the table, however, it's good manners to use British knife-and-fork skills, keeping the fork in the left hand, tines down, and the knife in the right. Talking with your mouth full is considered uncouth, and fingers should be used only for food that can't be tackled another way (so in pubs, cafés and other casual eateries it's perfectly acceptable to eat your chips or burger with your hands).

    If you're invited to someone's house for dinner, always take a gift. Even if the host refuses when asked in advance, take a bottle of wine, some flowers or a box of chocolates.

    'Shouting' is a revered custom where people rotate paying for a round of drinks. Just don't leave before it's your turn to buy! At a toast, everyone should touch glasses and look each other in the eye as they 'clink'.

  31. Local regulations
  32. Smoking is banned in most eateries, and most states and territories are bringing in non-smoking sections in bars, clubs and pubs, too, so it's getting quite unlikely that you'll be able to smoke inside - it's best to never plan on it.

    Bike helmets are compulsory in all states and territories, as are white front lights and red rear lights for riding at night.

    Australians drive on the left-hand side of the road and all cars are right-hand drive. An important road rule is 'give way to the right' - if an intersection is unmarked, you must give way to vehicles entering the intersection from your right. The general speed limit in built-up areas is 60km/h (and in some cases 40km/h) on residential streets in most states - keep an eye out for signs. Near schools, the limit is 40km/h in the morning and afternoon. On the open highway it's usually 100km/h or 110km/h. Getting caught over the speed limit can result in a hefty fine.

All travel and tourism related content about the destination has been provided by Lonely Planet Publications Pty Ltd. ANZ has not checked the accuracy or reliability of such content and makes no representations or warranties in relation thereto.

Important tax information

Anyone who receives income from Australia may be subject to tax in Australia and may require an Australian Tax File Number (TFN). For more information, you should visit the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) website or seek independent tax advice.

While you are living outside of Australia and have advised your current overseas address, ANZ is obliged to deduct non-resident withholding tax from any interest credited to you at the relevant withholding tax rates. Visit the ATO website for more information on "Investing in Australia" or seek independent tax advice.

Once you have arrived in Australia and have advised ANZ of your Australian address you may supply your TFN to ANZ, although it is not compulsory to do so. This is typically beneficial for customers with savings accounts because if you do not quote a TFN, ANZ is obliged to deduct withholding tax at the highest marginal tax rate (plus Medicare Levy) from any interest credited to you unless you are in an exempt category. If you are in an exempt category, you should let us know. If you do not have a TFN, you should contact the ATO on 13 28 61 (within Australia) or +61 2 6216 1111 (from overseas) to have an application form sent to you, or you can apply over the internet. Where TFN withholding tax has been deducted from your interest, you are usually entitled to claim a credit at the end of the financial year in your Australian income tax return.

Health care

Australia has a modern health-care system. A mixture of privately run medical clinics and hospitals sit alongside public hospitals funded by the Australian government. There are also specialised public health facilities for women and children in Australia's major centres.

  1. Medication
  2. Pharmacies throughout Australia can supply medications including painkillers and antihistamines. You may find that some medications readily available over the counter overseas are only available in Australia by prescription, including the oral contraceptive pill, most medications for asthma and all antibiotics. If you take medication on a regular basis, bring an adequate supply and ensure you have details of the generic name as brand names may differ between countries. The Yellow Pages has a list of medical practitioners, general and specialist, close to you. In an emergency, dial 000 for an ambulance.

  3. Public health care
  4. Medicare is the Australian government-owned health insurance that covers a variety of medical services in the public health system. The level of Medicare cover you are generally eligible for will depend on whether you have a permanent or temporary visa. The Australian Government has a reciprocal agreement that provides citizens of certain countries (currently the United Kingdom, Malta, Finland, Sweden, Italy, New Zealand, the Netherlands and Ireland) with restricted access to Medicare. If you are visiting Australia from these countries, you may be covered for emergency treatment in a public hospital.

    To enroll for Medicare you will need to visit a Medicare office with your passport and other travel documents. You can find out more about the coverage offered to overseas citizens by visiting the Australian Department of Health and Ageing, or by calling its 24-hour answering service on +61 2 6289 9853. To contact Medicare, call 13 20 11 within Australia or visit Medicare.

  5. Private health care
  6. There are also a number of private health insurers in Australia who offer cover for private hospitals and for many other services including dental insurance. Visit Australian Private Health for more information.

  7. Overseas Student Health Cover
  8. Health insurance is a must for overseas students. In fact, it is a condition of your student visa that you’re covered by an Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) policy while you’re living and studying in Australia.

    It's private health insurance that may help you pay for medical, hospital, prescription medicines and ambulance treatment should you get sick or have an accident while you’re studying here.

    Australia's 'Medicare' health system does not cover all international students. Without private health insurance such as OSHC you may have to pay the full cost of any medical expense or hospital stay. This could add up to many thousands of dollars.

    There are a range of providers and products available to students offering choice of cover while studying in Australia.

    This information was provided to ANZ by NIB.

There are also a number of private health insurers in Australia who offer cover for private hospitals and for many other services including dental insurance. Visit Australian Private Health for more information.

Work

Many jobs are now listed through online recruitment agencies. The websites of these recruitment companies also provide useful information on preparing resumes, interview techniques and background information on companies that are hiring. Below are some of the main websites where jobs are advertised:

  1. www.seek.com.au
  2. www.careerone.com.au
  3. www.mycareer.com.au
  4. www.jobsearch.gov.au
  5. www.workingin-australia.com

Buying a home

To rent a property in Australia you will generally require a bond and proof of address. Once you have arrived and your ANZ bank account is activated, ANZ can provide you with proof of address if you request a bank statement to be sent to your residential address.

Rent may vary significantly from one Australian State to another, with prices generally increasing the closer you are to city centres. The rental market is competitive, and you might find yourself competing against others for a well-located house or apartment. Useful websites for rental properties nationally include:

  1. www.realestate.com.au
  2. www.domain.com.au

Another way to search for a place to live, whether you want to rent or buy is by downloading the ANZ Property Tracker for iPhone1 App. ANZ's free2 Property Tracker App allows you to search for and shortlist your favourite properties. View our online demo and download at anz.com/propertytracker.

When it comes to financing the purchase of your home, ANZ has flexible home loan3 features and benefits to accommodate your changing needs as well. To apply for a loan or find out more visit an ANZ branch or our home loans page.

If you're buying a property in Australia or simply bringing some belongings over with you, be sure to insure them. ANZ Home Insurance4 provides award winning cover5 for your buildings with protection against natural events including flood. You can also insure your contents under ANZ Home Insurance, which could be an ideal option for renters and home owners as it provides cover in the event of accidental damage or loss, or theft, even for belongings that you take outside the home.

1. iPhone mobile digital device. iPhone is a trademark of Apple Inc. App Store online store. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.
2. Users may incur charges from their mobile service provider for downloading and using ANZ Property Tracker App.
3. Ask us for details. All applications for credit are subject to ANZ's normal credit approval criteria. Terms and conditions, fees and charges apply.
4. Residency status and eligibility criteria apply.
5. ANZ Home Insurance (buildings cover) won the CANSTAR CANNEX 5-Star award for 'Outstanding Value' Home Insurance Australia in 2009 and 2010.
ANZ Home Insurance is co-issued by OnePath General Insurance Pty Limited (ABN 56 072 892 365, AFSL 288160) ('OnePath General Insurance') - phone 13 20 62, and QBE Insurance (Australia) Limited (ABN 78 003 191 035, AFSL 239545) ('QBE') - phone 13 37 23. Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (ABN 11 005 357 522) ('ANZ') is an authorised deposit taking institution (Bank) under the Banking Act 1959 (Cth). OnePath General Insurance is owned by ANZ - it is an issuer of the product but is not a Bank. This product is not a deposit or other liability of ANZ or its related group companies and none of them stands behind or guarantees OnePath General Insurance.
The information provided is general in nature and does not take into account your personal needs and financial circumstances. You should consider whether ANZ Home Insurance is right for you by reading the ANZ Home Insurance Product Disclosure Statement (PDF 828kB) before acquiring or continuing to hold the product, which is available by visiting any ANZ branch, by calling 13 16 14 or by visiting anz.com.

Children's education

Depending on the state, children in Australia are required to attend school between the ages of 5 and 16. The Australian schooling system has Government-run schools, independent schools run on a private basis, and schools run by the Catholic Church.

Government schools are either free or subject to low fees. Independent school fees can range between AUD$6,000 and AUD$20,000 a year. Catholic school fees generally fall somewhere between. If you are a private school education, ANZ has a number of ways to help you save. To find out more, visit an ANZ branch or our saving accounts product page.

Australia offers a range of local government and privately run childcare centres, community based day-care or the option for a private nanny. Costs are partly subsidised by the Federal Government. Children attending Australian childcare and schools require proof of immunisation against a range of diseases listed in the Australian Immunisation Schedule. You can find the requirements at Medicare's website.

Personal transport

  1. Drivers licence
  2. A permanent-resident visa holder with a current driver's licence from another country is generally allowed to drive for the first three months after arrival in Australia. After three months, you will need to have the appropriate driver's licence for the State you are residing in.

    In Australia, drivers' licences are issued by State and Territory governments. Depending on the State or Territory you are in, you should contact one of the following:

    1. New South Wales
    2. Victoria
    3. Queensland
    4. South Australia
    5. Western Australia
    6. Tasmania
    7. Australian Capital Territory
    8. Northern Territory
  3. Buying a car
  4. Before you decide to buy a car in Australia, you may consider reviewing some dedicated car magazines which provide independent tests and reviews. Most major newspapers also include a weekly car guide. Other sources for useful car information include:

    1. www.drive.com.au
    2. www.carpoint.com.au
    3. www.carsales.com.au

    ANZ can also assist you. Visit ANZ Car Loans to find out about the general features of car loans, and estimate how much you can borrow. When you are ready to apply for a car loan, you can call ANZ Car Loans on 13 22 071.


    When it comes to car insurance, visit ANZ.com for value for money car insurance2 with a wide range of benefits and cover options.

    1. All applications for credit are subject to ANZ's normal credit approval criteria. Terms and conditions, fees and charges apply. ANZ Car Loans are provided by Esanda Finance Corporation Limited ABN 64 004 346 043 member ANZ group of companies. A facility with Esanda Finance is neither a deposit with nor liability of ANZ. Esanda is a separate entity from ANZ and is not an authorised deposit taking institution under the Banking Act.
    2. Residency status and eligibility criteria apply.
    ANZ Car Insurance is co-issued by OnePath General Insurance Pty Limited (ABN 56 072 892 365, AFSL 288160) ('OnePath General Insurance') - phone 13 20 62, and QBE Insurance (Australia) Limited (ABN 78 003 191 035, AFSL 239545) ('QBE') - phone 13 37 23. Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (ABN 11 005 357 522) ('ANZ') is an authorised deposit taking institution (Bank) under the Banking Act 1959 (Cth). OnePath General Insurance is owned by ANZ - it is an issuer of the product but is not a Bank. This product is not a deposit or other liability of ANZ or its related group companies and none of them stands behind or guarantees OnePath General Insurance.
    The information provided is general in nature and does not take into account your personal needs and financial circumstances. You should consider whether ANZ Car Insurance is right for you by reading the ANZ Car Insurance Product Disclosure Statement (PDF 528kB)) before acquiring or continuing to hold the product, which is available by visiting any ANZ branch, by calling 13 16 14 or by visiting anz.com.

Transfer money to and from Australia

  1. Transferring money to Australia
  2. If you need to transfer funds to Australia, you simply need to provide your overseas bank with the following details:

    Beneficiary: [Enter your full account name]
    Beneficiary Account No: [Enter your account number]


    Please ensure this information is provided as follows:
    e.g. BSB 01XXXX
    Account: 123456789
    Note: Your Australian BSB is the first six numbers that appear before your account number.


    Beneficiary Bank: Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited
    (SWIFT BIC ANZBAU3M)
    Beneficiary Branch Address: [Enter your branch address]

  3. Transferring money from Australia
  4. We know that leaving your home country doesn't necessarily mean leaving behind all your commitments and it is likely you may need to transfer money back either regularly or from time to time.

    To transfer funds from your ANZ Australian account to an overseas receiving bank, you will need the following information.

    1. The beneficiary’s full name and address - the beneficiary’s phone number is also required for selected countries.
    2. The beneficiary’s account number or IBAN (The IBAN is the International Bank Account Number required for payments to Europe and other selected countries).
    3. The beneficiary bank’s SWIFT BIC code or full bank name, branch number and address.

    You can also find out more information on transferring money to and from Australia from the International Payments website.

    Terms and conditions available on application. Fees and charges apply. ANZ International Money Transfers can be purchased using an ANZ transaction account or ANZ credit card only.

Protect yourself and your property

We have a range of insurance products1, including general insurance and life insurance.

Home buildings insurance - protect your home (buildings) with award winning home insurance2. ANZ Home Insurance helps provide peace of mind. If your home is destroyed3, your buildings may be rebuilt, no matter what the subsequent costs.

Home contents insurance - great for renters and also home owners as it provides cover in the event of accidental damage or loss, or theft, even for belongings that you take outside of the home.

Landlord insurance - ideal for property investors, providing a safeguard for your rental income, with cover for the building and if you need it, for the contents you provide.

Car insurance - value for money car insurance with 3 levels of cover to choose from to suit your needs. Benefits can include: your choice of repairer, car towing services, theft or damage of personal belongings and much more.

Life insurance - an easy and convenient way to help financially protect your loved ones from whatever the future may hold, providing long-term support to help deal with the everyday cost of living.

Disclaimer:

  1. Residency status and eligibility criteria apply.
  2. ANZ Home Insurance (buildings cover) won the CANSTAR CANNEX 5-Star award
    for 'Outstanding Value' Home Insurance Australia in 2009 and 2010.
  3. If destroyed by an insurable event and your claim is accepted.

ANZ Car Insurance, ANZ Home Insurance and ANZ Landlord Insurance are co-issued by OnePath General Insurance Pty Limited (ABN 56 072 892 365, AFSL 288160) ('OnePath General Insurance') - phone 13 20 62, and QBE Insurance (Australia) Limited (ABN 78 003 191 035, AFSL 239545) ('QBE') - phone 13 37 23. ANZ life insurance products are issued by OnePath Life Limited ABN 33 009 657 176 ('OnePath Life'). Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (ABN 11 005 357 522) ('ANZ') is an authorised deposit taking institution (Bank) under the Banking Act 1959 (Cth). OnePath General Insurance and OnePath Life are owned by ANZ - they are issuers of these products but are not Banks. These products are not a deposit or other liability of ANZ or its related group companies and none of them stands behind or guarantees OnePath General Insurance or OnePath Life.

The information provided is general in nature and does not take into account your personal needs and financial circumstances. You should consider whether any of these products is right for you by reading the relevant Product Disclosure Statement before acquiring or continuing to hold the product, which is available by visiting any ANZ branch, by calling 13 16 14 or by visiting anz.com.

Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (ANZ) is an authorised deposit taking institution (ADI) under the Banking Act 1959. ANZ is regulated by the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA). It is not regulated in the UK by the FSA for the provision of insurance.

Open an Australian account

More info

Contact us

ANZ can assist you with your banking when moving to Australia. Get in touch

Resources
  1. Foreign exchange rates
  2. The current time in Australia
  3. Australian weather forecast
  4. Welcome to Australia
    (PDF 178kB)
  5. Buying Your New Home (PDF 500kB)
  6. Understanding financial planning
    (PDF 389kB)

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© Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (ANZ) 2009 ABN 11 005 357 522. ANZ's colour blue is a trade mark of ANZ.

Any advice does not take into account your personal needs and financial circumstances and you should consider whether it is appropriate for you.
ANZ recommends you read the Terms and Conditions and the Financial Services Guide before acquiring the product.

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